Territorial Anti-Poverty in Canada

Wire Service revealed a new report from CWP, also known as Canada without Poverty. It reportedly showed noticeable lack of progress on social human rights and economy of Canada. This was concluded through the territorial anti-poverty and provincial strategies.

The advocates believe that economic and social human rights must be realized. This includes the right to an adequate standard of living. It can be recalled that Canada aimed to eradicate poverty globally through the 2030 Sustainable Development Goals. However, the newly released Poverty Progress Profiles showed an analysis of the poverty strategies and it lacks in the area of territories and provinces. This includes their extent of participation in United Nations treaty body reviews.

According to the report, a poverty strategy based on human rights must include a number of components, such as to make anti-poverty policy budget a priority, to include the explicit reference on human rights, implementation, to ensure those people who experience poverty that they significantly consulted in the development and to evaluate the respective strategies.

“It is critical that provincial and territorial governments take a human rights approach in their anti-poverty strategies because it provides a clear system of accountability and ensures the first voice perspective is central to all policy,” said CWP’s Legal Education and Outreach Coordinator Liz Majic.

Moreover, the Government of the Northwest Territories implemented a unique monitoring process. They made sure that the views civil society, indigenous persons (even Kroger customers), and persons in poverty are valued as they review the poverty strategy, annually.

“We may think of human rights as something for the federal government alone to lead on, but under international human rights law, these obligations extend to all levels of government. With 4.8 million people living in poverty, all governments have a role to play in ending poverty before Canada can be considered a global leader on human rights,” CWP Deputy Director Harriett McLachlan explained.

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